Historic District Information

The center of Haddonfield and certain residential areas surrounding the business district are part of Haddonfield’s Historic District. Borough Code requires property owners in the district to obtain permission from the Planning Board before making any exterior changes.

Residents in this area considering exterior building work should contact the Community Development (Zoning) Office, Room 104 in the Borough Hall, to make proper application. The Historic Preservation Commission’s Consultant is available from Room 104 on Tuesdays, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. The Consultant advises property owners how best to comply with the requirements of the Borough Code. An informative publication, “Historic Houses in Haddonfield: A Preservation Guide”, is available through the Haddonfield Library.

Contents: historic preservation | why a historical district general information
how to obtain a certificate of appropriateness | Historic Preservation Guide (PDF pages)

HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION

The Historic Preservation Commission meets on days before the Planning Board meeting. (The Planning Board meets the 1st Tuesday of the month.)

WHY A HISTORICAL DISTRICT?

The purpose of Haddonfield's Historic District Ordinance, enacted in 1971 and amended in 1987, is "to safeguard the heritage of the Borough of Haddonfield by preserving that part of the Borough which reflects elements of its cultural, social, economic and architectural history." The creation of a historic district, in contrast to individual historic designations, preserves and enhances the overall historic environment.

Historic district designation protects the entire ensemble. The streetscapes have an architectural harmony that is enhanced by trees, brick sidewalks, garden, fences and gates. In the business district architectural harmony includes storefronts, signs, lighting, awnings and paving - the amenities that contribute to Haddonfield's historic character.

Haddonfield's Historic District includes four hundred eighty-eighty houses, buildings, and sites in the town's historic core of which more than 150 are of the highest historical or architectural significance. These meet the criteria of evaluation for historic preservation used by the National Register of Historic Places. The remainder are architecturally compatible, presenting a harmonious environment. Every building in the historic district contributes to the entire district.

The District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982, subsequent to its listing on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places in 1980. The dual listing in addition to the local designation provides an important combination of protective mechanisms.

From Historic House in Haddonfield: A Preservation Guide, published by the Borough of Haddonfield.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The center of Haddonfield and certain residential areas surrounding the business district are part of Haddonfield's Historic District. Borough ordinance requires property owners in the district to obtain permission from the Planning Board before making any exterior changes.
Residents in this area considering exterior building work should contact the Zoning Office, Room 104 in the Borough Hall, to make proper application. The Historic Preservation Commission's Consultant available in Room 104 on Tuesdays, 1:30pm to 5:00pm. The Consultant advises property owners how best to comply with the requirement of the ordinance. An informative publication Historic House in Haddonfield: A Preservation Guide, is available through the Haddonfield Library. 

HOW TO OBTAIN A CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS

Ordinary repairs to structures in the Historic District such as minor carpentry, downspouts and gutters, brick step repairs, etc. can be made without waiting for review if the work costs less than $500 and the material is replaced exactly to match the original material. The work should be documented with "before and after" photographs submitted to the Zoning Officer after the completion of the work. However, if you are in doubt about a planned change, consult the Zoning Officer in Borough Hall who can quickly determine whether a Certificate of Appropriateness is required. Remember that roofing, siding and any alteration in the exterior appearance of the structure require a Certificate. If proposed changed entail extensive structural renovation, a registered architect or engineer may be required.

STEP 1: Pick up an "Application for Certificate of Appropriateness" from the Zoning Officer in Borough Hall. You can usually fill it out there. Although a licensed contractor may obtain the application and permit, ultimate responsibility for obtaining a permit rests with the owner of the property.

STEP 2: When you have completed the form, the Zoning Officer will determine the additional information necessary for the application to be complete. All applications should include photographs of the structure showing the area to be repaired and a written description of the work. Descriptions may be in the form of a builder's estimate or an architect's scope of work. In some cases other information may be required, such as a description of the replacement materials (these may be in the form of architect's technical specifications or manufacturer's literature), plans, elevations, and site plan. Additions may also require variances of other approvals by the Planning or Zoning Boards. Applications and supporting materials must be submitted with 20 copies. The Planning Board meets the first Tuesday of each month. The Historic Preservation Commission meets on the Wednesday 13 days before the Planning Board. Applications must be received 14 days prior to the Commissions meeting to appear on that month's agenda.

STEP 3: It is helpful for you to attend the Historic Preservation Commission's meeting when your application is reviewed to discuss the work with the Commission. Commission members are knowledgeable about historic preservation and building repairs. After reviewing the application, the Commission will prepare a written report making recommendations to the Planning Board. A copy will be made available to you prior to the Planning Board meeting.

STEP 4: Attend the Planning Board meeting when your application is reviewed to discuss the work and the Commission's recommendations. A member of the Commission will also be present to discuss the work. The Planning Board has the authority to approve or deny the application.

STEP 5: Pick up your Building Permit from the Zoning Officer in Borough Hall any time after the Certificate of Appropriateness is approved.

from Historic House in Haddonfield: A Preservation Guide, published by the Borough of Haddonfield.